Disability Arts Online

Crippen defending a charity - whatever next?! / 21 February 2013

Currently running on Facebook is a campaign lambasting the Comic Relief 'Red Nose' day because, they say: "(We) are annoyed and distressed at Comic Relief's decision to include David Cameron in the video to this year's charity single by One Direction. They then go on to list all of the atrocities committed by Cameron, aimed at sick and disabled people, and those on benefits or on a low income.


Firstly, let me make it clear that I agree wholeheartedly with this group's stance against Cameron and the present government. What the ConDems are doing to certain sections of our society beggars belief. I have, along with other disabled activists, been in the thick of the fight against them and will continue to take my place alongside those who challenge the government.


However, to boycott an organisation that is the very antithesis of Tory policy, just because of Cameron's appearance in the video is, in my humble opinion, not exactly constructive.


Many years ago, when Comic Relief, Children in Need et al first appeared on the scene, disabled activists throughout the country were appalled at the patronising crap which oozed from our TV screens. Not only did we boycott these appeals but we also tried to make sure that everyone knew why. We chained ourselves to the railings outside TV stations, we leafleted and a few intrepid souls even managed to gate-crash televised events to publicise our cause.  "Piss on pity", "Rights not charity", "Nothing about us without us" were bold new statements way back then.


We all know what Mr Wogan and his cronies did. They ignored us and have pretty much continued as if nothing had happened. Lenny Henry and the other, original Comic Relief organisers, however, started up a dialogue with us and asked what they were doing wrong.  They listened when we explained and took our criticisms on the chin.


From this small step many of us began working with Comic Relief (arguably the ONLY such charity to have agreed to work with disabled people on our own terms). Some of the results have been the increased involvement of disabled people in the organisation, funding being directed towards organisations "of" rather than "for" disabled people and changing the "tragic but brave" stereotype that so damages our struggle for equality and full citizenship.  (And it became an approach they've used with other groups they support, too.)


Those of us who are really long in the tooth will remember that landmark training resource "Altogether Better" which was so vital to disability equality/disability action training throughout the 1990s and beyond.  Perhaps for the first time, it enabled Deaf and disabled people of all ages to tell our own story through the video clips and materials it brought together and it tackled some highly controversial issues head on.  Who funded it?  Well, Comic Relief actually.


So please guys, hammer Cameron and his cowboys as much as you can.  I'm with you on that.  But don't risk sabotaging probably the only organisation of this type which, in my opinion, has worked hard to take our issues on board and provided a level playing field for us all to operate together on.


Thanks for listening.  Rant over (for now!).

Keywords: attitudes,benefit cuts,charities,children in need,comic relief,crippen,cuts to services,david beckham. disabled people against cuts,deaf culture,deaf issues,direct action network (dan),disability,disability activists,disability equality,disability equality training,disability history,disability pride,disability professionals,disability publications,disability representation,disabled peoples movement,disabled peoples protest,disabled women,discrimination,history of disabled people,identity,learning difficulties,learning disability,mental health,political,politics,poverty,protest,pudsey,social model,television,young disabled people

Comments

singingbird artist

/
27 February 2013

I am all for dialogues...

but the reason I have to comment is to say: PEOPLE, CHECK YOUR LANGUAGE!

Why call Cameron Camoron if you support the right to respect for people of low IQ (moron and cretin are horrible historic terms for IQ falling below 100) also Fatboy, people of size often became that way due to medication "SIDE" affects and experience huge stigma from society that considers them unworthy of respect, when 95% of weight reducing diets are proven to fail, this is another case of bullying...

PLEASE BE CONSIDERATE!

Would it be ok to say someone is "spazzing out" about this? NO! So...if you want respect, don't insult abusers using terms that are used to bully other victims of prejudice...

There's more but that's my spoons for being round prejudiced people and trying to challenge prejudice...to those of you who are respectful, wow, you have my respect at surviving in this atmosphere...

richard downes

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24 February 2013

Altogether Better for those interested in inclusive education is available as a free download on http://worldofinclusion.com/resources.htm

richard downes

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23 February 2013

bIG uP Harry Styles and one direction for the most subversive idea of the year - teaming up with wavy davy camoronic to centre him in their mash up of teenage kicks and the threat one way or another we're gonna get ya, get ya.

Labour supporter Harry didn't say; "i'm a red. he's gonna be black and blue" and neither did red nose founder Richard Curtis ever imply that his charity endeavours we're to politics what wavy davy's politics were to charity.

A homeless person, disabled person and food bank queue-r, reached deep within their hideous hordes of pathetic pity to deliver the refrain "One way or another we're gonna feck ya, feck ya, feck ya". This spontaneous outburst on street singing raised 12p. A member of the band said "it ain't going to good causes"

Richard Curtis was not thought to have thought that this constituted high street robbery and a direct attack on comic relief resources but he might have done.

richard downes

/
23 February 2013

LEST WE FORGET:

In March 2011, Richard Curtis apologised following a complaint by the British Stammering Association about 2011 Comic Relief's opening skit, a parody by Lenny Henry of the film The King's Speech.[11]

Crippen

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23 February 2013

Morning folks. Have just woken up and logged on to see where we're at with this long overdue debate about 'Rights not Charity'. They've been going at it hammer and tongs on the 'We All Shot Pudsey Bear' Facebook page! There's some really powerful issues being raised and we now need to find a way to use all of this energy to fight the common enemy, rather than each other? I've decided to write an open letter to Comic Relief for my next blog. I won't pre-empt what I'm going to say, so that's me signing off from this particular blog issue. See you back on the ice!

Crippen

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22 February 2013

Thanks Nancy. It's good that we're back on each others Christmas card lists again eh ;-)

You, Dennis, Bob, Rich and the others make a good point though. The people that I remember dealing with back when CR first started were, as you say, the more radical left-wing comics who took our equality message on board and embraced it. They changed their whole style of funding after that, even to the projects that were being organised for Africa. They insisted that the people who needed water in their village, for example, were the ones who received the funding and not some representative body who would take their own cut from it.

Many of you will be too young to remember the impact that the 'All together Better' video and the associated training material that was funded by CR had on the establishment. Many of us were struggling to fund the material for disability equality training that we were offering main stream organisations at the time, and this material - put together by disabled people - provided us with a valuable resource.

My feelings towards Comic Relief are of course coloured by my own experiences with them during this time. And no, Nancy, I don't think Thatcher would have been given a look in when CR first started. In fact comics like Ben Elton spoke out against the governments involvement in the projects that CR were undertaking at that time.

So I agree with you all that Comic Relief need a wake up call and a reminder of where they stood with us all those years ago. As I've said, I'm happy to be involved in a campaign to make them take stock of where they currently are, and, as Dennis points out, to show them the error of their ways in supporting charities like Leonard Cheshire and Scope.

What's the next move ... a Facebook page?!

Nancy Farrell

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22 February 2013

Just to clarify to everyone reading this I'm one of the people organising the campaign against Cameron being in the One Direction video for Comic Relief this year. Me and Crippen have discussed this privately, and indeed publicly on the page and have arrived at the compromise. We will remove the word Boycott from the title of the page, as we do not want people not to donate to the cause as they do a lot of good work and we know that.

It's heartening to hear the original founders of Red Nose Day an Comic Relief did meet with you and accept the criticism and try to change their approach and I applaud them for it. The event and charity were started by the group of comedians known as the comic strip comedians and was good back then. An interesting point I'd like to make is that if they were still in charge, do you think they would have used Cameron in the video like they have? Remember they don't organise it anymore it's been passed on to new people. I don't think they would have included Thatcher back then for example, do you?

I think this shows that the organisers of the modern event have become out of touch with the views and feelings of disabled people in the UK again, and we perhaps have to remind them.

And Camerons cuts are not just effecting disabled people too, the new statistics for child poverty in general in the UK are very alarming, And the increase of users in food banks are similarly bad. It's obviously a poor decision on their part to include images of him paling up with a boy band trying to make himself look "cool" and "down with the kids" at a time when his policies have caused so much suffering.

Arty Farty

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22 February 2013

Ha ha ... wonder if anyone else has noticed you've changed your picture? So does this mean that you're half convinced by the comments that have been put forward?!

Crippen

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22 February 2013

Dennis, I'm with you 100% in what you've said. I hadn't realised that CR funded other charities. I'll join any attempt to contact them to make them see the error of their ways in this respect.Thanks for raising this.

Crippen

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22 February 2013

@Felicity via We All Shot Pudsey Bear: As one of the group of Crips who met and worked with Comic Relief all those years ago, I stand by what I said. They did listen and work with us on several occasions although we obviously have different memories of those past events. The video and resource pack 'Altogether Better' we made with CR was a vital tool at the time to get the message of disability equality across to a largely unreceptive audience. The debate is on my blog and I'd be really pleased if you'd post your comments on their for more people to read as I respect your point of view. Thanks,

miss Dennis Queen

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22 February 2013

Red nose day gives finding to multi billion business (Leonard) Cheshire foundation, a target of DAN for a long time as part of its FREE OUR PEOPLE agenda. We've protested at their events and offices many times. They are one of the biggest global incarcerators of our people.. which we chat thousands of crips are being neglected and denied freedom and independent living in their homes. I think 2 things.. 4 actually. 1. charity in itself can be ok it just depends what it is and what it is doing - eg DPOs yes, Leonard cheshire, no. 2. the whole telethon thing does us damage. 3. yes pls take the money so some asshole can't. 4. don't expect me to ever support any fundriaser who supports Leonard Cheshire a major oppressor of our people. warehousing those in dependence for PROFIT

Crippen

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22 February 2013

As many of you will know, I'm a long time antagonist of the so called 'disability' charities and have had several battles in the past with the likes of Leonard Cheshire, Scope, Mencap etc., When I decided to raise people's awareness of the benefits of the Comic Relief campaign I didn't just throw all of that out of the window. As many have said far more eloquently than I can, in a perfect world the whole concept of charitable giving wouldn't exist and we, along with other oppressed groups wouldn't need to go cap in hand in order to receive the funding that is ours by right. But the reality is that CR are the only ones in my experience who have actually stopped and listened to us and have provided funding without the usual strings attached. Like many I abhor the whole 'telethon' aspect of the fund raising and will continue to protest against that. Nancy and Christos (the organisers of the Boycott campaign) have now changed the name of the campaign so that people are better able to understand what it is they are protesting about (Cameron and the video), which is all I wanted in the first place. So hopefully we're all happy campers again?!

Phoebe Queen via Face Book

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22 February 2013

I understand the need to be practical, but I'm really not sure how practical CR is as a credible funding source. £80m a year in grants after admin, it's a pittance for funding shortfalls, one that covers for the nation's conscience whilst care funding alone is probably facing a national shortfall many times the size. Little projects here and there can benefit a little from it but it's measly stuff the sheer volume of needs it is being spread over. That's the point of rights not charity though, no? That charity solutions mostly just cover up for systematic inadequacies.

richard downes

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22 February 2013

Isn't it crazy that we back charity as a means to achieving social justice within a time limited period. We will be here to help you achieve social justice on a personal level for three years say. Me, i'm 58 and rapidly approaching age and condition when social justice will be more and more important to me. But using my current age as a marker is it right that I can have social justice, equal rights, etc for three years and no one is going to care about the other 55. One of my early debates about this was in a pub and someone said to me 'if I want to pay for someone to go on holiday I will'. Great. That's maybe 10 days out of 365. I don't think anyone here is knocking anyone else for using charitable monies for good causes. Its more a concern that the model is not good, the model has its pitfalls.

'd also like to take the time to transcribe (oh ok, copy and paste) the view of a we all shot Pudsey bear member who saw history differently. She said:

"Be serious, Crippen! I'm plenty old enough to remember.

Comic Relief allowed a few disability rights activists a couple of minutes on their first broadcast. Then Lennie Henry appeared, looking very solemn, and said it was a pity some people felt that way but everyone had a right to their opinion, even if he couldn't understand it. The other Comic Reliefers (who liked to think of themselves as PC) nodded sagely & agreed that it was sad that some bitter people didn't approve of people doing good.

Btw, I've never heard of the 'Altogether Better' training resource but the title sounds yucky".

Lynn

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22 February 2013

From 2006 - 2009 I established, co-ordinated and delivered a mental health crisis advocacy service which, thanks to the hard work of Judith Stephenson (for 15 years manager and backbone of The Council of Disabled People Warwickshire and Coventry).

This project supported approximately 3000 people during that time.

Many of the clients were people who had not and could not find support elsewhere. For example, a young man with severe physical impairments and learning difficulties whose care package had been cut due to nothing more than him becoming 18 which had caused him severe distress to the point where pressure was being put on his family for him to be given antipsychotic drugs to control his 'challenging behaviour'. IMCA only provided advocates for people who had no family or friends (one wonders then for many how some people would actually appoint an advocate). The advocacy service negotiated with the local authority and health funders, his care was restored (after threats of legal action) and he and his family were happy again.

There were many clients who were faced with battles with local authorities whose policy on supporting disabled parents seemed to boil down to this being far too expensive, too risky and anyway there were adoption targets to meet which brought funding from central govt. Solicitors almost exclusively, said all the right things but... they got paid whether parents won or not and they also represented the local authority.. best not bite the hand that feeds..

Others were clients with both mental health and physical or sensory, LD or autistic spectrum conditions, it's actually very difficult in many places to find advocates who operate 'outside boxes' due to the restrictions of many funding streams (eg IMHA) and for people with mental health conditions, the only other advocacy service required people to be receiving CPA (care programme approach from mental health services). As many survivors may know, quite a few people don't actually want to use mental health services for very good reasons, or, conversely, mental health services don't wish to provide a service for many people.. the mental health system is often, well... 'mad'.

Without Comic Relief this service would not have existed, sadly, it doesn't exist today due to funding expiring and structural and management changes within CDP (which no longer exists now either).

Many of my former clients have tracked me down via FB and I am happy to now be friends with them and to continue to provide online support, information etc. Some are continuing to face tough battles and have told me they have no one to turn to irl as no independent service exists anymore.

I do not support the FB group criticising Comic Relief and fear that on top of anything else it's bad publicity for those who have established it. Why cut off our (red)noses to spite our faces?

I read some of the comments made on a story in the Guardian about this asking readers to come up with captions for the photo of a very awkward looking Camoron with the members of the boy band and one, in particular, made me smile, it read something like: 'talentless group of yobs whose career has been based entirely on clever PR campaigns, plus One Direction'

Christos Palmer

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22 February 2013

I'm the person who set up the boycott red nose day page on facebook, I still believe in boycotting the entire charade of a night of pathetic tv, but the other admin doesn't, I can't and won't back down on what I believe, nor will I. However, the page run between me and Nancy will reflect a compromise of what we believe, some form of protest against the british govt. and the british prime minister.

Tom Comerford

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22 February 2013

Its interesting to see comments on the charity debate.

Yes a lot of money is raised for different causes, but it is spent on what we don't want.

The disability movement is divided and I say if money is there for us to support disabled people to be equal in a better future then grab it, but use it not on the helping tragic and cap in hand model that we have all seen, but to educate and come up with more solutions to create opportunities to stop the do gooders from patting us on the head (I spend less money on shampoo for my baldy bonce)

Humour is much needed and that is what I use as an advocate.

We are disabled by society not by what we look like or act and just last week a very good activist admitted to his disability, he is an Aston Villa fan.......but he also stated he could more oppressed if he supported West Bromwich Albion.....oo oo oo

Crippen

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21 February 2013

I've just read that the group have changed their campaigning name and have removed the word 'boycott' which I'm sure will clarify the situation for people. Their message does appear to be clearer in as much that they are objecting more to Cameron inserting himself into the Red Nose publicity video and asking that people buy a red nose and paint it black as a mark of opposition to his involvement. Let's all learn a lesson from this perhaps and be clear about what we're actually opposing. :-)

richard downes

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21 February 2013

By the way have Comic Relief kept up with their history. If not then they need to read this thread now. Someone call the red nose hotline and get that lenny henry fellow to chat with us again. He might also want to answer the burning question have I been funny ever since I became a naff celebrity involved in char-I-dee. Well ok maybe he's ok on radio 4 some of the time. As a black country man I wouldn't wanna go overboard though. The boating lakes too deep.

richard downes

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21 February 2013

if its true that I ate all the ice cream is it true you ate all the pies Crippen? Making unfounded accusations like that proves you wear my ring. By the way I was only asking dearest and don't really mean any offence. Your ever loving hubby.

Theresa Hodge

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21 February 2013

I don't particularly like Comic Relief and don't wach it, but I think it's important to recognise the way they've worked with us to understand disability equality. I hadn't actually realised that they'd taken on board the issue of groups "of" of as opposed to "for" disabled people, so this is good. I don't like the fact that we have to rely on services provided by charity, but the fact is that with less and less government funding we do need to. So if there's a charity that's going to work with us then I would rather work with them than not. Saying all that, I don't like having to rely on welfare benefits and government schemes either, but the fact is that the barriers we experience in our lives mean that we often don't have a choice.

Celia Lawton-Livingstone

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21 February 2013

If Cameron thinks that associating himself with One Direction will make popular he's sadly mistaken! Can't we make an effigy of "fatboy" (look at the before and after PM photos and you'll know why I call him "fatboy") and ceremoniously burn it for red nose day?

I'd laugh anyway...

Lauretta Pearson

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21 February 2013

Please don't let one bad apple spoil it for the rest of the good apples! I don't like the fact that Cameron is included but if One Direction want to be used and abused in inadvertently or otherwise helping Cameron gain popularity and help him stay in power then so be it, but they (One Direction) are only a one-day-wonder also, once the young girls move on to another pop group they will disappear and so will Cameron. However, Red Nose day and all the good it does will march on and on and on and on!!

Crippen

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21 February 2013

Ha ha ... Mr Downes. If I was your wife you'd know about it! Thanks for bringing up the link to the 'We all shot Pudsey Bear' campaign which I know you're a tireless advocate of. We can both agree I think that the usual charitable representation of disabled people has done nothing to assist us in our fight to gain equality. As Bob says, I'd rather Comic Relief didn't exist, and I also accept its politics are all over the place, but in the final analysis it does benefit sections of the oppressed who would be worse off without their involvement. Now, you bastard, what have you done with all the ice-cream?!

Crippen

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21 February 2013

Thanks Bob. A well considered, balanced response as usual AND cutting straight to the heart of matter. I agree, it is time we cut the crap and took stock of where disability politics is at the moment. So much energy is wasted fighting, usually in the wrong direction and with each other. This week's blog was an attempt to focus people's attention away from frittering away what little time we have remaining, and to join together to identify and fight the real oppressors.

Bob Williams-Findlay

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21 February 2013

Isn't this fun Crips having a debate? Who belives in 'Rights not Charity'? Great slogan, but what does it mean in Cameron's Britain of February, 2013?

Questions, questions, questions. I haven't gone all Tom Shakespeare or Postmodernist, but I do recognise that most things aren't black and white nor should we employ mantras rather than offer a critical appraisal of political situations.

I believe disabled people and others are right to challenge the culture, role and politics underscoring established charity - most of it is oppressive, judgemental, corrupt and counter-productive - but there's also a need to consider how it operates and, I would argue, be careful not to tar it all with the same brush. In truth, there's nothing wrong with its core values; it has been distorted by capitalism.

And talking of capitalism, aren't many current Crips fighting to defend the Welfare State? Isn't this too, contradictory because its role in our lives is bitter-sweet; a hard fought gain, but at the same time a means to keep us fit for exploitation. I've no qualms with attacking oppressive practice, but equally see no logical benefits to adopting a dogmatic or 'cut-off-our-noses' approach towards politics.

I agree with Crippen, Comic Relief is different from most of the others; I'd rather it didn't exist, I accept its politics are all over the place, but in the final analysis - like the Welfare State, it does benefit sections of the oppressed who would be worse off without. It's not in the same league as SCOPE, DRUK, RNIB - disablist oppressors.

We need to challenge Comic Relief, point to their hypocrisy, and criticise them when and where it is necessary. However what we do must be proportionate - who are our real enemies? Comic Relief has done more for our liberation than all the disability charities put together - The struggle for 'rights' wouldn't have taken the shape it did without them - bollocks to what Lenny Henry did or diidn't say, the key factor was the financial support it provided for almost a decade - empowerment not posture politics.

Lastly, 'Rights not Charity' - what are or were these Rights? In my opinion since 1995 British Governments have handed out 'rights' in the same patronising manner as do-gooders have offered us 'charity'. Isn't it time we cut the crap and took stock of where disability politics is really at in this moment in time?

richard downes

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21 February 2013

by the way another view on the history of this in we all shot Pudsey bear https://www.facebook.com/groups/46564848880/

Good to see mature debate breaking back out

richard downes

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21 February 2013

Dear Crips. Are you my wife?

Dear Arty Farty. Down here in the south I get it in the neck for being a northerner. Its all flat caps and whippets don't you know. Oop north it gets grim when I get it in the neck for being a southerner. I'm actually glad to be superior and sit on the divide. Black Country Rules. Don't be put off its ok to do a bit of posh (i'm not telling you which bit but, i'lleven do salmon now)

Arty Farty

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21 February 2013

Tee hee ... me and Mr C the same person. I wish. Anyroadup I'm the wrong gender - and I'm not telling which one! ;p

PS. Hagen Das. Is that the posh stuff you all eat down south?!

Crippen

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21 February 2013

So now you love me. You don't phone, you don't write ... ;)

richard downes

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21 February 2013

thanks for the thumbs up mr arty farty. I like you too. Often see you commenting on dave's work. Always wondered; are you one and the same? Must admit it would be a brill strategy for getting comments on your own work. If you are not one and the same.... will you buy me an ice cream too. I am really deserving of ice cream and am really polite and would say thank you. I like Hagen Das, and the chocolate glory you can get in pizza express. Whilst i'm doing all this ice cream begging (open to donations from anyone in the country - most sincerely folks) I realise I am yet to make my own pathetic statement to go along with this tragedy model theme so can I just say I've not been well

richard downes

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21 February 2013

I love Dave Lupton. I've always got the impression he's so kind, cuddly and lovely that I couldn't help but love him. I also condone his right to be brave and make tragic statements that are going to impinge on his fan club (you're not losing me though) as he knows he has here. And I truly wish the little fellow all the best because of this.

Once upon a once upon a time in the so far off distant past I had a falling out with a mate. She was big on People First and organising as a limited company. She was shocked and distraught when she found out I was working for a disabled people's organisation that organised itself as a charity solely to get the money in. We had a right set to. She shouted at me asking me where my ideals were. I shouted at her, non disabled woman, for opposing the pragmatic decisions of a disabled people's organisation. She kept on and on though. So, I criticised her right to engage with the medical model and to get her son fitted with grommets or some such device so that he could hear in stead of teaching him sign language. We made up and kissed when it was all over as good friends will but....

I thought i'd just share that as its a nice little parable showing the tension between our ideals and our pragmatism.

I'm not sure if Dave is right on this one (an unusual event), I respect his right to say it, I won't be supporting Comic Relief - its just more cheap tv to me - which I won't even watch, but if the opportunity ever came along i'd apply to it for funding and people I respect out there who I have already spoken to, whose opinions I respect, have endorsed this.

In the meantime Dave, i'm not asking you to smile and say thank you for this rather half hearted support (no money was exchanged) but if we ever meet up will you buy me an ice cream to wash down one of the great storms in a tea cup, created here on the wonderful DAO home of engaged debate.

Arty Farty

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21 February 2013

"we are not asking people not to donate" ... no wonder the message is unclear with a double negative like that one! I agree with what Rich has said (a lot of respect for that man) but I also understand where you're coming from MR C. At the moment we do have a path to the money through Red Nose and we'd be fools to bite the hand that enables us to feed ourselves - in my humble opinion!

Dave Lupton aka Crippen

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21 February 2013

Thanks for your comments Rich. I realise that I'm falling into the trap here of condoning the work of a charity, and all that it means with regards to our struggle against how we are perceived and labelled by society.

But at the present moment in time, the reality is that we still need Comic Relief as an ally. Comic Relief have stuck with the disability equality message throughout and were first to understand the distinction between groups 'of' and groups 'for'. And as I've said, have provided the funding which has allowed many disabled people to have a voice.

My argument stands however. The protest group's FB page is already getting lots of comments from people who are stating that they will NOT be supporting Comic Relief this year which is one of the concerns I raised (they've taken the title of the protest group literally and not, as I understand it, as was intended).

I applaud the group's reasons for confronting Cameron in this way but their message is not clear and it is already starting to damage the Comic Relief campaign.

And no, as one sarcastic person suggested on FB, I'm not being funded by Comic Relief or ever have been. I just consider myself a realist.

Boycott Red Nose Day campaign - via Facebook

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21 February 2013

Have awoken this morning to find Dave Lupton has misunderstood completely what we are doing here. So again I have to make it clear. We are NOT asking people not to donate. In fact to take part in the even we are encouraging people to buy a Red Nose and paint it black in protest. I myself am going to travel over 10 miles later today to buy a Red Nose when I would not have before, I'm going to buy all three types if the shop has them left. All we are asking is that David Cameron is edited out of the video by One Direction as we see this as a cynical attempt to make himself look caring when he clearly is not. 3.6 million children (according to Barnados) are currently living in poverty due to Cameron's governments relentless austerity measures, 58% of them in a family where someone works. As you well know Dave 10,600 disabled people died in 2011 after being subjected to the flawed WCA. Do you really think it's appropriate comic relief use images of this man in their fund raising measures that will probably go towards putting right some of the damage he's done? Doesn't it make you angry too? Please join us in asking them to remove the footage, or say we will refuse to watch the TV show. That is all we mean by Boycott, people can still donate and take part in sponsored events etc.

richard downes

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21 February 2013

Best of the bunch works then eh Dave.

I think its a bit like the anti government thing as well. Lets get these bastards out so we can get the next bastards in. Worked last time we went to the polls.

I'm not sure if the idea put forward previously that we need to accept it just because its there works either.

What I do like about your post is that you are very clear on the history of progress being made. I certainly didn't know that.

Something else that doesn't work for me is the campaign groups idea of boycotting by buying their product. There are other ways of making your nose black anyway.

However the boycott is based on anti-Cameron participation in fundraising. Which given that Blair did the same thing for Children In Need highlights what we are up against - the re-perpetuation of tragedy model techniques by the state to prop up their own callous disregard elsewhere. Cut services, let charity in to pick and choose, the eligible from the ineligible, the deserving form the undeserving.

Mind you having said that I have been known to cave in too http://detrich.wordpress.com/2013/01/19/chatting-to-a-chugger-the-activist-caves-in/

Which ain't to say either of us is right or wrong. Just that we are on different points with respect to this particular piece of charity culture

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